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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the political cliche of low-hanging fruit is something so cartoonishly insensitive, so cartoonishly villainous, you then bring upon us a second political cliche. you have jumped the shark. blocking voluntary efforts by people to get rid of their own guns because they want to voluntarily? that is an exercise in shark jumping. this is the sort of thing that might make sense internally to the nra when they talk about this amongst themselves, but the rest of the country are not picking a fight, but looking for problem solving, nonconfrontational ways to help each other out. trying to block the voluntary tucson gun buyback program does not make sense. the whole reason gun policy is supposed to be seen as so intractable, so unreformable, so politically untouchable and not in america is that the national rifle association has created a mystique about themselves, a mystique about their own power that is supposed to caution anyone who might want to reform gun laws that it just cannot be done. no matter who we are, no matter where we live, no matter how or why we might want to reform our gun laws, no ma
, talk to your fellow parents. talk to your kids, you know, and i don't mean to over use the cliche, but have the conversation. it is not enough to turn off the news and walk away from the tv and go, oh, that stinks. not this time. >> and it is not just republican, democratic, independent. that is the thing that has just blown my mind. that i feel like it is really not about your party right now. >> it is not, it is not. >> i really feel like it is about our children. so i would say that at this moment, that i -- my gut is telling me that we have to continue to talk about the children. they are the future of this country. and it is going to -- you know, they're going to be the next set of parents. and they would want the set of things we want. protection and safety. and you know. i think that is -- >> you know there are much larger cultural and societal issues here. i -- we can't even begin to address those because they're just so enormous. but you have to start somewhere. you have to start somewhere. and i love the idea that this group has put forward saying that sandy hook, you kn
. they were not about the self-proclaimed, self fulfilling cliche of the gun lobby's power. it was not the nra is so powerful. he paid tribute to the power of the american people to influence congress to say yes to some things that even congress is not inclined to say yes to. the only way we can change is if the american people demand it. and that doesn't mean from just certain parts of the country. we're going to need voices in those areas and those congressional districts where the tradition of gun ownership is strong to speak up. this will not happen unless the american people demand it. if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, if hunters and sportsman if every american stands up and says enough, we suffered too much pain and care too much about our children to allow this to continue, then change will come. you know, in the letter that julia wrote me, she said i know that laws have to be passed by congress. but i beg you to try very hardly. julie, i will try very hard. but she's right. the most important changes we can make depend on congressional action. they need to bring the
's a failure to pay bills, don't look at both sides. none of the malarkey and cliches. will that work its way into news coverage? will people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> well, it seems like that has happened every time. that republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made. because they have been doing a bit of foot dragging. so he definitely is laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in that process conference which i think people will resonate with which is this idea if you go out and buy an expensive meal, you can't when the check comes refuse to pay the bill. he a likening that to a refusal to raise the debt ceiling. it resonates to people who can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> glenn, do you think the people in the tea party are paying the bill or not paying the bill or saying yes to spending? the way they look at it. >> i think what they think is they're looking at a different set of polls that say a significant portion of the electorate c
cliches. the republican party wants to stop this government, blame them. will that work its way into the news coverage? will the people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> it seems like that has happened every time. that the republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made, because they have been doing a bit of foot-dragging. so he is definitely laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in the press conference, which i think people will resonate with, which is this whole idea, if you go out and buy an expensive bill, when the check comes, you can't refuse to buy the bill. he is likening that to refuse tolerate the debt limit. it resonates with people and they can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> just to check, glenn, do you think people in the tea party think that they're paying the bill or not paying the bill, or do you think they're saying yes or no to spending, the way they look at it? >> oh, yeah. i think what they think is they're lookin
still call no-brainers if that's not too bad a cliche. people ought to get serious penalty penalties if they buy a gun that they intend to pass on to a criminal. people ought to be able to pass a background check which takes about 90 seconds out of their lives. he is in the big middle of this country where 800 mayors are, where about 80% of the country is. and the nra is increasingly marginalizing itself. i can't quite figure out why. >> you see, my issue this, with the political part of this is i can understand certain republican congressmen and women who are in red states and who genuinely believe that actually these proposals are wrong. but there are a number of republicans i think who actually would be persuaded on some of these arguments, but who won't even think about going there because of fear of retribution from the nra. and as for the democrats who apparently are threatening to stand up to the president on this, i just don't believe them. i think they're only doing that for political expediency. >> well, in the weird thing about this is if you actually look closely at the n
he did that well in school himself. this is a segment we call the botched cliche of the day senator edition. >> well, first off, we're not -- i'm not setting the bar like the kids have to become rocket surgeons. >> rocket surgeons. is that like tree surgeons? >>> next, let's take a look at this headline from the washington times. quote, reagan's home could become a parking lot for obama's library. we're looking at what you might call an extreme case of jumping the gun. this is an apartment building in the chicago neighborhood of hyde park where president reagan spent a bit of his childhood. the site is owned by the university of chicago and they're planning to tear it down to provide parking space for the expanding campus. cue the right wing. since the university of chicago could eventually be the site of barack obama's presidential library, isn't it possible that the parking lot might be for people who might want to visit the library which could destroy the place where ronald reagan spent less than a year of his youth? just think of the desecration. >>> a right wing explosion in su
and keeping their powder dry if i can cram some cliches in there. it's unusual to do an interview when you're awaiting confirmation. you're supposed to do an immediate blackout. he chose his hometown newspaper to do it. while do we care about this as a political story, will he be confirmed or not? everybody thinks in the end he will be. senator schumer is key here. a democratic nominee who doesn't have a scandal or personal scandal, all about policy, very rare to beat somebody just on policy, particularly if it stays an inside game. are there people in washington, in elite circles who want to stop hagel? absolutely. is the public engage on this? no way, not now. the challenge for the people who oppose is to do one of two things, either get the public engaged and say we want to stop chuck hagel, unlikely or pick off a prominent democratic senator who says i can't support this person. schumer is the key. if schumer supports hagel, almost impossible to stop him. >> i have to say, not to -- i feel like this is all - all -- especially the extreme opposition here, it's kind of a waste of time. t
exercise. it's a lifestyle change. it's kind of cliche, but it truly is. >> so there's no shortcuts. >> no, there aren't. look, it's very simple. it's less going in and more exercise. >> is it a challenge, though, every day? >> oh, yeah. >> but have you changed your lifestyle? >> i've changed, but it's still work. again -- and my wife, deborah roberts, who's on 20/20 and abc, she's a person who eats, but she's a size 4. she works out. she runs. there's a certain mindset, i think, that naturally thin people have that those of us who are not don't have. we were at the chicago airport a few weeks ago coming home, and we're walking down one of the terminals. and we're walking by a mcdonald's, and i went, ooh, mcrib is back. she didn't even see that sign, but i saw mcrib is back. >> probably some beautiful picture. >> my old friend, mcrib. hello, mcrib, i've missed you so. >> what i think is fun is that you actually use d food to woo your then friend into being your fiancee. >> deborah was going off to do the olympics and asked me -- look, we're friends. she's a beautiful woman. we're friends.
the border is secure. that is very, very important. and the devil is, to use a cliche, in the details there. also goes for how they detyfine path to citizenship. >> jessica, you're getting some new information about the white house, the president is planning to propose, maybe as early as tomorrow, when he's in las vegas. >> the difference between the president's plan and what the senate has proposed is the path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants who are here illegally. the senate plan, as you've explained, would require essentially officials verify that the u.s. border is secure before any of the immigrants, these immigrants can begin signing up for citizenship. the president's proposal would include no similar border security trigger, if you will. now, to help the president press his case, beginning next week, a grassroots coalition that the white house has actually been working with for months dating back to the president's -- the type the president was campaigning for re-election. the coalition will begin a campaign next week that's called bibles, badges and business. it's a gr
're across the street from here is -- it is almost cliche, but it is amazing. there is one building that is completely destroyed. another building that is damaged, but not destroyed at all. and just on the other side of that, completely destroyed another building. this tornado came through here and just was very selective, but completely devastating in the targets it found. >> it is almost like it sounds like that zigzag we hear so often when we talk about tornadoes. miguel, thank you so much. george, let me bring you in. i hope you have a monitor. have you seen pictures of this, this tornado we have been showing out of adairsville, georgia? >> well, i've seen a few clips from the adairsville tornado and it looks like something that i would be used to seeing in kansas, in may. so it is very ahtypical for thi time of year. but we occasionally get deep south tornado outbreaks in late january, february. they tend to be fast moving storms and therefore quite dangerous. but they do happen. and people that live in that part of the country really do need to watch it pretty much year round.
alabama, wind, rain and more misery. what you're looking at there is a building that's almost cliche to say but that building was perfectly fine. the one next to where we're standing was a rental, apparently nobody was in there so nobody injured or killed here, but it is always amazing to see these things, how it skips from one and misses another. >> miguel marquez for us this morning. it is always amazing how a swath is just shredded and then homes stand right nearby. thanks, miguel. appreciate the update. let's get right to our meteorologist, indra petersons. let's look at the forecast, is it moving out? >> for the most part it's just left in the northeast. the story today really isn't about that severe line of storms but rather all that cold air behind it that was the troublemaker in the first place. i want to give you an idea how strange this weather was in the first place. monday, 48 degrees. look at chicago, 48 degrees. by tuesday it got up to 63. yesterday severe weather, 44 degrees. currently now down to 17 with a chance of snow showers in the forecast. so, yes, very wacky we
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)